Thursday, October 10, 2013

CSN Houston update

Here's the rundown of the Cluster**** that is CSN Houston right now:

*Jim Crane and the Astros are saying that Comcast's Involuntary Bankruptcy motion is actually an effort to gain control of CSN Houston. Crane told AP's Kristie Rieken that, if a carriage deal is not in place by the beginning of next season, he would explore streaming Astros games on the internet.

*The Astros' motion to dismiss the Involuntary Bankruptcy motion says that, "Comcast is asking for a do-over by attempting to portray, what is really a dispute among three partners, instead as a dire threat to third party creditors. But there are no third-party creditors' interests at stake. Each of the Petitioning Creditors is a subsidiary of Comcast."

If I may sum that up, the Astros say that Comcast is lying, claiming that a dispute between Comcast, the Astros and the Rockets is being portrayed as a threat to people who aren't actually involved in the financial aspect of CSN Houston.

Maury Brown wrote (see 2nd link):
In a day when television media rights have become the most critical revenue stream for each club in Major League Baseball, the CSN Houston dispute will - at the very least- create payroll flexibility issues. Clubs such as the Tampa Bay Rays have been able to be competitive for several years now with low revenues and player payroll. The difference for the Astros is the "deep pain for long-term gain" strategy that the club is taking.

*Comcast isn't biting on Crane's bait to engage in a war of words before the October 28 hearing.

Check out CSN Houston updates from:
October 5
September 30
September 28


farmstros said...

Interesting to see Crane's reference to streaming games on the internet. Wonder how that would work since games are already available on not subject to blackout restrictions)??

Anonymous said...

I'd be interested to know that too. I think it would be a move solely to settle fans down some & secure public opinion. Currently there's no way for the Astros to make money by streaming games online. This whole thing is about the money that tv contracts provide.