Thursday, May 19, 2011

Uh-oh. The New York Times is on the case...

The New York Times' Richard Sandomir addressed the problems that Eagle Global Logistics' discrimination case could cause for Bud Selig.

Crane might not be facing a courtroom as he seeks approval to buy the Astros. But the other 29 owners will, in effect, be jurors determining his suitability to enter their exclusive club. One thing they might explore is Crane’s workplace record since the E.E.O.C.’s investigation, and whether he fully complied with the agency’s requirement that he pay for a managerial leadership program.

Street made a good point, and we would be remiss not to include this:
Crane and his company have denied the allegations and called the E.E.O.C. investigation flawed. Only 10 percent of the claims by employees were deemed worthy of compensation, and Crane wound up getting $6 million back from the E.E.O.C.

2 comments:

street said...

To add: "Only 10 percent of the claims by employees were deemed worthy of compensation, and Crane wound up getting $6 million back from the E.E.O.C."

Anonymous said...

This is a much bigger story than the self-appointed experts like Craig Calcaterra and Rivers McCown are claiming it to be.

Jim Crane's company ended up paying substantial money to settle the claims of not one, not five, not 15, but TWO HUNDRED AND THREE blacks, Hispanics and women.

Marge Schott was forced out of MLB for some ugly comments, but as far as I'm aware, she never paid $1 to anyone on the basis of discrimination.

MLB was probably hoping this wouldn't become a big story, but now that it has, I don't think we've heard the last of it.