Tuesday, February 9, 2010

The Astros and RISP

So it seemed like every time we turned around, if there was a runner in scoring position, then the inning ended with that Astro removing their gloves while standing on base, and another Astro flinging his helmet at the ground and making loud, angry noises. How bad was it, compared to the rest of the League? Note, all these stats are with RISP, and are organized by OPS.




















TeamPAsAvg/OBP/SLGXBH
PHI1705.255/.359/.437140
ATL1721.278/.369/.420118
COL1717.258/.347/.436143
FLA1740.272/.367/.411113
MIL1729.262/.357/.421124
Astros1546.267/.343/.427119
StL1684.263/.362/.403113
NYM1737.276/.358/.405114
WSH1692.255/.350/.404117
LAD1855.259/.358/.385121
ARI1636.240/.336/.391118
CIN1627.250/.335/.391111
PIT1601.251/.336/.389112
CHC1689.241/.340/.376112
SD1673.242/.354/.34888
SF1611.245/.323/.373100


Surprised? The Astros had the 5th-highest OPS with RISP in the National League, and 2nd-highest in the NL Central. How did this translate into getting worked over in the run column? Because the Astros had 55 fewer plate appearances than the next lowest team (Pirates, natch). It doesn't matter that the Astros had a higher OPS w/RISP than the Dodgers, because the Dodgers had over 300 more plate appearances with RISP than the Astros. So obviously, you can get away with a lower OPS if you have that many more opportunities to score runs.

Why even look at this? Because the Astros are doing literally nothing right now. And I feel like I need to do something every day.

And no, I don't know what's up with that last column.

No comments: