Friday, January 15, 2010

Dave Cameron / Rob Neyer react to Valverde

From FanGraphs' Dave Cameron:
Seriously, in a market where everyone else is finding bargains, the Tigers pay $7 million a year for a good-but-not-great relief pitcher, and give up a draft pick for the right to do so. Were they not paying attention to the rest of the contracts being handed out? Did they not realize they were bidding against themselves? How do you justify dumping Curtis Granderson to save money, and then use that money (and more!) to sign a flyball reliever with command problems who has never pitched in the AL?...

...For one year and a team that had money to spend, the salary wouldn’t be that bad. But two years and a loss of a draft pick? Really? In this market? On a team that is going cheap at second base and in center field?

Sorry, but this is a bad use of resources.


And reaction to that, and the deal, from Rob Neyer:
But a pitcher like Valverde -- any relief pitcher, really -- should be the final ingredient. You fill all the other holes you can fill, and when you're satisfied with your catchers and your first baseman and your second baseman and your shortstop and your third baseman and your three outfielders and your four best starting pitchers ... When you're satisfied that you've done everything you can possibly do at all those spots, then you start worrying about the guy who's going to pitch 65 or 70 innings.

If you've done all that and you've still got $14 million rattling around in your pocket, sure, by all means, go sign Jose Valverde and fork over a draft pick. But the Tigers haven't done all that. In a year or two, this may be a really, really tough move to justify.


Can I just mention how happy I am that everyone is questioning the wisdom of an organization, and for once it's not the Astros?

1 comment:

BistroBob said...

Two years ago, I met Valverde. He says, "hey, I'm Valverde. I like Houston, but it is hot." I say, "Hey, I'm BistroBob. I love Houston. I'm from Houston!" He will be muy frio in Detroit. What are the odds that we sign their "closer" and they sign ours for nearly twice as much? Unreal. Today, Fast Eddie looks like a million bucks.